Just Go With It

I’ve returned to my natural state. Everything I own is in a bag. The rear-end of the car is dragging on the tires from the weight of stuff that will ultimately end up in a storage container. Kate just got home from her last day of work with a bottle of wine. The corkscrew is packed away at the bottom of a box, but at least my camping gear is coming on the trip, so my Swiss Army knife is available. We’re each wearing different white Red Sox shirts as I twist the corkscrew portion of the Swiss Army knife into the cork and pull like hell while hoping not to splash red wine on either of us. Success! It’s going to be a good week off.

Map of lava flow hazard zones for Island of Hawai`i

The USGS’ Lava-flow Hazard Zone Map. I guess we’re supposed consider this when looking for housing? It’s going to be an adventure.

It’s been a wild ride to get this next assignment’s contracts in place. Actually, they aren’t really in place, I’m just going in on blind faith with fingers crossed. Kate got an assignment set in Kona, HI through a recruiter. We thought long and hard about whether Kona was where we wanted to go and what our other options were. When it became apparent that there were some more jobs around Kona and a couple opportunities for independent contracts presented themselves, we committed to Hawaii.

People ask me about independent contracts a lot. Let’s be clear, I am no expert on independent contracts, but I do have a little experience. Whatever I’ve done this time around is not the way independent contracts should be done. I’ve verbally accepted two PRN jobs with no idea what the pay is.

It all started well. I have had two different interviews at places that would like me to work for them. Seems simple enough from there, right? Let’s sign the contracts and get started with work. Unfortunately, neither of the jobs has 40 hours for me, but they both say they have 20-30 hours for me. We have talked pay, but I have no commitment from either job on exactly what the pay will be. I supposedly have a job offer in the mail from the private practice, and the hospital I have spoken with has cautioned me that they are run by the state, so “it can be quite a process to set-up a contract.” I’m antsy to have a contract in hand, but Kate keeps reminding me about “Aloha time.” Aloha time is the Hawaiian equivalent of “Don’t worry, be happy.”

The start of the Ironman Kona swim is right around the corner from my job. The locals call it “The Pier,” and I cannot wait to go get some open water swimming in.

Kate’s right, things are going to go fine, we always land on our feet. I have two places in Kona that want me to work for them and want me to start in under 10 days – that’s a pretty good situation. It’s Hawaii, they’re relaxed, and I should be too. No one else is worried, they expect me to show up on the 19th and start work. Nothing left to do but knock on wood, hop on the plane, and hope someone has scheduled me some patients when I get out there.

Remember, don’t do this. Be more business savvy than I have been. When talking finances of a contract, be clear, be confident. Because I have not been clear or confident when talking about the business parts of my independent contracts, there’s nothing left for me to do but wait and start working on my transition into Aloha time. Patience is a virtue, don’t worry brah.

To Be Continued...

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